Newfoundland: Avalon Peninsula

Posted on Aug 5, 2013 | 0 comments

Newfoundland: Avalon Peninsula

The Avalon Peninsula is home to over half of the island’s population of 500,000. St. John’s, the capital city of Newfoundland and Labrador, is near the tip of the northeast corner of the peninsula. It is the oldest English-founded city in North America and has the oldest street in North America. It also has some of the steepest streets I have ever seen.

Just a few minutes after arriving downtown, about to head up to Signal Hill, the oil pressure light in the Touareg went absolutely berserk. This isn’t the normal oil light with a gentle ding. It is the other light with a piercing alarm and warning to stop the engine immediately. The street was so steep that I temporarily lost oil pressure. Apparently I was a few quarts low on oil! After pouring in four quarts, I was good to go again. Note: keep a better eye on oil levels.

The steep climb up to Signal Hill is worth it, though. It has panoramic views of the city, the harbor, Quidi Vidi Lake, the Atlantic Ocean, and nearby Cape Spear, arguably the easternmost point in North America. It is also the spot where Marconi received the first transatlantic wireless signal in 1901. Yes, there is a ton of history in this part of Newfoundland.

I stayed at a campground about a half an hour outside of St. John’s. It let me head into the city quickly, but also let me easily check out other areas like Brigus, The Irish Loop, Trepassey, Saint Vincent’s, Petty Harbour, and Witless Bay.

For years, I have been on the lookout for whales. From the Inside Passage of Alaska to Cape Breton Island of Nova Scotia, a close-up view has always eluded me. Sure, I have seen them from afar, but never up close and personal. Bay Bulls and Witless Bay seem to have all the popular whale watching tours in Eastern Newfoundland. Most are on giant tour boats capable of holding several hundred passengers. I chose a slightly smaller one – an eight-passenger Zodiac from Witless Bay Eco Tours.

After jumping into our bright red survival suits, we headed to a spot just outside of the bay where whales had been spotted earlier in the morning. Sure enough, within a few minutes, the first humpback whale appeared on the horizon. So the captain sped towards the spot where we saw the spray. We found not just one, but a pod of humpbacks. One of the big tour boats had also spotted the pod, and was right on our tail. The whales were staying near the surface, coming up for air every few minutes. Every one in our boat was pretty excited to be a few dozen feet away from the whales. And I swear the big tour boat was about to tip over as everyone walked over to the starboard side. And then, out of nowhere, some of the whales made their way to our boat. At the time, I was so excited that I didn’t quite comprehend that some 40-ton, 50-foot mammals were directly underneath our postage stamp-sized home on the water. It was absolutely unbelievable! Soon the whales left, and we did the same. For a pure adrenalin rush, it was the most exciting two hours of my entire three weeks in Newfoundland.

It takes quite a bit of work to get all the way over to the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland, Canada, but it is so worth it. To get on the island, I took the short five-hour ferry from North Sydney, Nova Scotia to Port aux Basques. But since I made the trek over to the eastern side, instead of driving back to the ferry at Port aux Basques, I decided to take the ferry from Argentia back to North Sydney. If you don’t like boats, then this probably isn’t the ferry ride for you. It took 17½ hours, plus a couple of hours to board and an hour to disembark. In all honesty, it wasn’t that bad. There is a restaurant, a cafe, a bar, a movie room, a game room, a gift shop, and plenty of places to sit and watch TV or hop on (unreliable) Wi-Fi. I didn’t get a berth, so I stayed up for as long as possible and then napped for a few hours in a reclining seat. I even had a steak dinner, some wine, and a little dessert at a table with white linens. See, it wasn’t so rough.

Typical greens and blues of Newfoundland
Typical greens and blues of Newfoundland
Trepassey Lighthouse
Trepassey Lighthouse
Trepassey Lighthouse from afar
Trepassey Lighthouse from afar
The Irish Loop
The Irish Loop
The Irish Loop
The Irish Loop
The Irish Loop
The Irish Loop
The Irish Loop
The Irish Loop
The Irish Loop
The Irish Loop
Humpback whale breaching
Humpback whale breaching
Humpback whale blowing
Humpback whale blowing
Humpback whale breaching
Humpback whale breaching
Humpback whales under our boat
Humpback whales under our boat
Humpback whale diving deep for food
Humpback whale diving deep for food
Humpback whale breaching
Humpback whale breaching
Millions of birds at Witless Bay Islands Park Reserve
Millions of birds at Witless Bay Islands Park Reserve
Witless Bay Eco Tours Zodiac
Witless Bay Eco Tours Zodiac
Idyllic village of Brigus
Idyllic village of Brigus
View atop Signal Hill
View atop Signal Hill
View of St. John's atop Signal Hill
View of St. John's atop Signal Hill
View of Cape Spear atop Signal Hill
View of Cape Spear atop Signal Hill
Quidi Vidi
Quidi Vidi
View from Cape Spear
View from Cape Spear
View from Cape Spear
View from Cape Spear
Quidi Vidi
Quidi Vidi
Cape Spear Lighthouse
Cape Spear Lighthouse
Petty Harbour
Petty Harbour
Jelly Bean Row
Jelly Bean Row