Posts Tagged "Nova Scotia"

Canadian Maritimes: Digby to North Sydney

Posted on Jul 22, 2013 in Airstream, Places, Stories | 0 comments

Canadian Maritimes: Digby to North Sydney

On my first visit to Nova Scotia back in 2010, I took the long way through New Brunswick. This time, I took a shortcut. A ferry across the Bay of Fundy to the town of Digby cut the day’s drive down to just a few hours. My plan was to check out the western part of Nova Scotia, most of which I missed the last time. Unfortunately, a low pressure weather system moved in about the same time I did.

In the fog and mist, I made my way to the Digby Neck, a peninsula made of two thick lava flows. Near the tip of the peninsula is “Balancing Rock,” a 30-foot-tall basalt column that has somehow balanced itself for over 200 years. The rock is on Long Island, a section only accessible by a 3.5-minute crossing aboard the Petit Princess ferry. Normally just a $5 round-trip toll, I had to pay a $1.50 surcharge to take the Airstream on the ferry. Not a bad deal! Once on the island, and after a quick drive through the small village of Tiverton, there is a gentle 1.5-mile hike down to St. Mary’s Bay. Then, there are 235 steep steps to get an eye-level view of the rock. Yes, 235 steps! It was quite literally breathtaking—at right around step number 460 on the way back up.

I don’t know if I ran over something on that little side excursion or if I simply had a tire failure, but soon after getting back to the main road, one of the tires on the Airstream had a major blowout. A good Samaritan let me park in his driveway and even drove into town to fetch the local mechanic. Yes, I was in the middle of nowhere! Within an hour, I was back on the road with my spare tire. (It took over a week to find a replacement Airstream tire near Halifax.)

With things definitely not going as planned, I decided to head straight to Lunenburg, one of my favorite places in Nova Scotia. I ended up waiting there a week for the weather to improve. It gave me time to check out Mahone Bay and Blue Rocks, two communities on either side of Lunenburg. In Blue Rocks, I met a family who had come from Quebec to deliver their baby out in the country. Before listening to the older sister tell the story, I had no idea the baby in her mom’s arms was a mere three days old! By the way, the girl was about four years old and was telling me this in both English and French (which her mother and grandmother translated for me). It was pretty adorable.

Blue Rocks is Lunenburg’s version of a place called Peggy’s Cove Village, just outside of Halifax. It is a working fishing village with a few shops and one famous lighthouse. Any visit to the Halifax Regional Municipality is not complete without a visit to Peggy’s Cove.

I would have spent much more time in the Halifax area, but with the weather improving, I had a boat to catch in North Sydney. Next stop: Newfoundland!

First view of land from ferry to Digby
First view of land from ferry to Digby
View of Tiverton from other side of the Petit Passage
View of Tiverton from other side of the Petit Passage
Waiting to take Petit Princess ferry
Waiting to take Petit Princess ferry
Balancing Rock
Balancing Rock
Gloomy view of typical Nova Scotia fishing village
Gloomy view of typical Nova Scotia fishing village
Blue Rocks
Blue Rocks
Blue Rocks
Blue Rocks
Blue Rocks
Blue Rocks
Blue Rocks
Blue Rocks
Blue Rocks
Blue Rocks
Downtown Lunenburg
Downtown Lunenburg
Downtown Lunenburg
Downtown Lunenburg
Downtown Mahone Bay
Downtown Mahone Bay
View of islands off coast of Chester
View of islands off coast of Chester
Sunset in Chester
Sunset in Chester
Chester Yacht Club
Chester Yacht Club
Sunset in Mahone Bay
Sunset in Mahone Bay
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove Lighthouse
Peggy's Cove Lighthouse
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove Lighthouse
Peggy's Cove Lighthouse
Peggy's Cove Lighthouse
Peggy's Cove Lighthouse
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
Peggy's Cove
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Tha Gaol Agam Ort, Alba Nuadh!

Posted on Oct 10, 2010 in Airstream, Campgrounds, Featured, Places | 7 comments

Tha Gaol Agam Ort, Alba Nuadh!

The second province on my tour of the Canadian Maritimes is Nova Scotia. As much as I loved Prince Edward Island, I think Nova Scotia is my new favorite. Technically a peninsula, mainland Nova Scotia is nearly surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean. As such, everything seems to revolve around the sea. (Hence, all the photos of boats!)

While PEI was incredibly rural, Nova Scotia has many more urban areas, particularly Halifax. I was pleasantly surprised by this capital city. The geographical location alone makes it noteworthy. Add the historical culture, the friendly people, and the vibrant downtown; I could easily become a Haligonian. (Yes, a Haligonian. I don’t make these things up!) Halifax is in the middle of the province, along the southern shores. This was probably my favorite section of mainland Nova Scotia. The southern shore is one non-stop Rorschach inkblot test full of bays and inlets with small fishing villages around every corner. Peggys Cove, Chester, and Lunenberg are ones that caught my eye. From there, I left mainland Nova Scotia to check out Cape Breton Island.

But first, a little geography lesson. To me, Nova Scotia is the shape of a giant whale. If the mainland of the peninsula is the whale’s head and body, then the tail (or northeast section of the province) would be Cape Breton Island. It is only connected to mainland Nova Scotia by a manmade causeway, and as a result, feels somewhat isolated–in a good way!

For those wondering the meaning of Nova Scotia, it is Latin for “New Scotland”. Québec has its French influence, Prince Edward Island its English, and Nova Scotia has its Scottish. Nowhere is this seen more than on Cape Breton Island. Let me tell you, it is a special, special place. English is still the main language, but road signs are also written in Gaelic, many of the locals in the small villages have a Scottish brogue, and there is even a Gaelic College on the island. I was lucky enough to visit during the Celtic Colours International Festival, a weeklong celebration of musical events featuring fiddlers, singers, dancers, bagpipers, and everything else Celtic. These events are held all throughout the tiny villages on the island.

Of those villages, I spent most of my time in the central spot of Baddeck, a thriving community overlooking the saltwater Bras d’Or Lake. Thanks to my handy Passport America membership, I found Adventures East Campground & Cottages, a cheap campground just outside of town. I had no idea, but Baddeck is actually quite famous, as it is the birthplace of Canadian aviation. It is here that Alexander Graham Bell (yes, that Alexander Graham Bell) successfully built his Silver Dart, a powered flying machine very similar to the Flyer built by the Wright Brothers. A National Historic Site in town displays his vast collection of inventions ranging from telephones to hydrofoils. Bell and his wife lived on their Beinn Bhreagh estate in Baddeck for decades. And I know why!

It is because of a 185-mile twisty, hilly, amazingly scenic loop around the tip of the island called the Cabot Trail. It is consistently rated as one of the best drives in the world, and Baddeck is the gateway to it. With its ocean views and autumnal colors, the trail combines the Pacific Coast Highway in California and the green mountains in Vermont. It is home to moose, whales, bald eagles. It is home to the serene fishing towns of Chéticamp, Petit Étang, and Ingonish. It is home to Highlands Links, an absolute gem of a golf course in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park. Because of all this, the Cabot Trail is now on my Top Ten List.

There is just so much to see and do in Nova Scotia. I didn’t get a chance to go whale watching, or hike the Skyline Trail in the Highlands, or kayak in the Atlantic, or have dinner down on Argyle Street in Halifax. These are all the on the list of things to do next time. And I can’t wait!

Oh, and for those who aren’t fluent in Scottish Gaelic, I am pretty certain that “Tha gaol agam ort, Alba Nuadh!” means “I love you, Nova Scotia!” It’s either that or “Get out of my way, you stupid American!”

Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Artwork along Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Artwork along Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Fishing boats in the Gulf of St. Lawrence
Fishing boats in the Gulf of St. Lawrence
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Sunset on Bras  d’Or Lakes in Baddeck on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia
Sunset on Bras d’Or Lakes in Baddeck on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia
Ferry to Caribou, Nova Scotia
Ferry to Caribou, Nova Scotia
Ship Hector in Pictou, Nova Scotia
Ship Hector in Pictou, Nova Scotia
Pictou, Nova Scotia
Pictou, Nova Scotia
South Shore of Nova Scotia
South Shore of Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Mural in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Mural in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Citadel National Historic Site in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Sunset along Cabot Trail
Sunset along Cabot Trail
Golf at Highlands Links
Golf at Highlands Links
What has to be world’s shortest ferry ride in Englishtown (about 45 seconds)
What has to be world’s shortest ferry ride in Englishtown (about 45 seconds)
Golf at Highlands Links
Golf at Highlands Links
Golf at Highlands Links
Golf at Highlands Links
Road signs on Cape Breton Island are in Gaelic
Road signs on Cape Breton Island are in Gaelic
Photo of Alexander Graham Bell’s Silver Dart
Photo of Alexander Graham Bell’s Silver Dart
Fortress of Louisbourg Chapel as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg Chapel as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
“Home” on Cape Breton
“Home” on Cape Breton
Making single malt whiskey at Glenora Distillery
Making single malt whiskey at Glenora Distillery
Making single malt whiskey at Glenora Distillery
Making single malt whiskey at Glenora Distillery
Making single malt whiskey at Glenora Distillery
Making single malt whiskey at Glenora Distillery
Lobster traps in Inverness, Nova Scotia
Lobster traps in Inverness, Nova Scotia
Inverness, Nova Scotia
Inverness, Nova Scotia
Inverness, Nova Scotia
Inverness, Nova Scotia
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Old MacDonald had a farm
Old MacDonald had a farm
Golf at Highlands Links
Golf at Highlands Links
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
Fortress of Louisbourg as it looked in 1744
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island
Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island

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